‘News from the Nile’

In 1915 Private Tom Dalton sent two letters to the Leader, a newspaper published in Orange, New South Wales. In the first, dated four days before Christmas Day he wrote about his arrival and first impressions of life in Cairo: “I received a letter of yours dated October 19. It is lovely weather here, nice warm days, and cool nights. We are about 12 miles … Continue reading ‘News from the Nile’

Sometimes we look but we don’t really see – a local link to Egypt

On a recent visit to the graveyard at All Saints church in Grasby, North Lincs I was very surprised to see the recent addition of a Commonwealth War graves sign – indicating the presence of a war grave. A quick consultation of the CWGC app revealed the name Arthur Frank Wescott of the Royal Field Artillery who died on the 13th of November 1918. Now I’ve … Continue reading Sometimes we look but we don’t really see – a local link to Egypt

‘The story of Nellie and Phil’ A Wedding Beneath The Pyramids of Giza

I spotted an interesting article on the Australian War Memorial this morning regarding an event which took place at the Giza Plateau in Cairo on the 17th January, 1915. Two men, on separate occasions, had regarded the event as newsworthy enough to record for posterity in their diaries and letters home. An Australian soldier at Mena Camp in Egypt, Private Arthur Adams, noted in his … Continue reading ‘The story of Nellie and Phil’ A Wedding Beneath The Pyramids of Giza

Sir Ronald Ross’ work on dysentery in Alexandria, Egypt during the Great War

The Ross Collection in the Archives of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine holds material on dysentery during the First World War. Sir Ronald Ross is famous for being the discoverer of the mosquito transmission of malaria and the first Briton to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine. During World War One he was appointed a consultant physician on tropical diseases to … Continue reading Sir Ronald Ross’ work on dysentery in Alexandria, Egypt during the Great War

Flies, Filth and Desert Soldiering …

It has often been repeated that the daily existence of Commonwealth soldiers during the Great War campaigns across the Middle East was extremely arduous. The soldiers accounts and recent archaeological surveys of the better preserved battlefields illustrate just how inhumane and gruelling the conditions were for both the Allied and Turkish Forces alike. Many factors contributed to making the desert battlefield an almost unendurable place … Continue reading Flies, Filth and Desert Soldiering …

John Hubert Worthington

Hubert, as he was always known, was born on the 4th July 1886 in Alderley Edge, Cheshire to Father, Thomas and his mother, Edith Emma. Edith was Thomas’ second wife. He was their youngest child.  The family were Unitarians, who used to worship at Dean Row Chapel near Wilmslow. Thomas was a well known architect who designed many buildings in and around Manchester. Perhaps his … Continue reading John Hubert Worthington

Private Ernest Donald Gow

Private Ernest Donald Gow 4th Bn, Australian Infantry, A.I.F. Died: 03.02.15 (Double Pneumonia, Mena Hospital, Cairo, Egypt) Age: 24 Headstone Inscription: ‘At Rest’ Son of William and Minnie Gow, of Ulmarra, New South Wales. Born at Wollongong. Ernest Donald Gow (Service No. 1207) was one of the first men from the Illawarra to die in World War 1. He was born in Wollongong in 1890, … Continue reading Private Ernest Donald Gow

‘The problem is not an easy one’ … cemetery construction, horticultural schemes and the Egyptian climate

In 1948 Hubert Worthington, the Principal War Graves Commission  Architect for Egypt and North Africa was busy adding his comments to the sketch plans, estimates and reports for the new cemetery construction at Tel-el-Kebir. The war memorial cemetery at Tel-el-Kebir, 110 kilometres north-north-east of Cairo, was used from June 1915 to July 1920 and increased after the Armistice when graves were brought in from other sites, including … Continue reading ‘The problem is not an easy one’ … cemetery construction, horticultural schemes and the Egyptian climate

‘One of the Best’ Private W.Vincent Rumbelow – Kantara War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

A few months ago I was lucky enough to find the Great War medals belonging to 240221 Private William Rumbelow of the 1st / 5th Bn Suffolk Regiment for sale on E Bay. I was really pleased to be able to purchase the medals and began to undertake some research into the life of their owner and the circumstances surrounding his death. After the Second … Continue reading ‘One of the Best’ Private W.Vincent Rumbelow – Kantara War Memorial Cemetery, Egypt.

‘These Kings of the Feathers, they steal your bread’

While most of Australia’s Imperial Force went to France in 1916, the bulk of Australia’s mounted forces remained in Egypt to counter to Turkish threat at Suez. After 1916  when the threat to the canal was over and victory at Romani had been secured the Light Horse advanced into Turkish territory. In 1917 they entered Palestine and by 1918 had advanced into Jordan and Syria. … Continue reading ‘These Kings of the Feathers, they steal your bread’